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Spaces that set trends on the big screen

The Phantom Thread: glamorous London.


The Paul Thomas Anderson’s films are not only recognized for their genius in the field of plot and their always remarkable selection of actors, but every detail in his films is perfectly and carefully thought out, and it was not going to be otherwise in his 2018 work: The Phatom Thread.

 

Set in glamorous post-war 1950s London, we contemplate the lives of renowned dress designer, Reynolds Woodcook (played by an outstanding Daniel Day-Lewis in the role he would choose for his last time in front of the cameras), and his sister Cyril (played by majestic Lesley Manville), who, at the center of English fashion, dress royalty, movie stars, and other women with enough flair to wear the clothes of the distinguished House of Woodcock. Faced with so much high-class excess, it was no less to expect a set and interior design that conveyed the allure and luxury in which the eccentric genius of Reynolds Woodcook developed his exquisite gifts.

 

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Bringing this classic creative environment to life – the Woodcock’s House and Workshop – were producer design Mark Tildesley and set decorator Véronique Melery SDSA. The two creative minds, along with the director, took it upon themselves to bring the personal psychology of Reynolds Woodcock’s character to life so that it was reflected in every angle and corner where the film was set.

 

For example, for one of the fundamental spaces of the film, the Grand Salon, Tildesley and Melery SDSA were influenced by the 40s and 50s Dior’s style. The first thing that will catch the viewer’s eye is the red curtains, in a deep dark red. Next, the eyes are caught by the carpet, a spectacular example of good taste, this is a classic French Aubusson carpet from the 18th century, perfect so that in the display of dresses they are never overshadowed by it. Perhaps the most important detail of the Grand Salon is, the mirrors, exclusively design for the film, but inspired by 1950s mirrors, their straight forms perfectly accompanying the elaborate chandeliers in the room.

 

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The Phantom Thread is a visual delight for every meticulous eye curious about spaces that truly convey the personality and history of its inhabitants. At this time, that the trend of customizing the workspace at home echoes strong among fans of design and decoration, this movie can be a very good source of inspiration.

 

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